“The Sheer Ecstasy of Being a Lunatic Farmer” At Earlham College

By KPass | Earlham College

Jan 31

Submitted by Earlham College Events:

farmer picThird generation alternative farmer Joel Salatin explores the industrial food vs. local transparent ecological food debate during a presentation at Earlham College.

Salatin presents “The Sheer Ecstasy of Being a Lunatic Farmer” at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 2, in Carpenter Hall’s Goddard Auditorium. Tickets are required for the Artist and Lecture Series event and cost $8 for adults and $5 for students and seniors.

Salatin’s Polyface Farm occupies 550 acres in Swoope, VA., and is featured prominently in the documentary film Food, Inc. and Michael Pollan’s book The Omnivore’s Dilemma. Salatin describes Polyface as a grass farm where chickens, turkey, pigs, cattle and rabbits live in a symbiotic feeding cycle. Cattle graze for 24 hours on a quarter of an acre pasture and then move to an adjacent quarter-acre pasture. Chickens follow three days later to feast on the fly larvae and further enrich the soil with their own droppings.

Meat and eggs from the farm are sold by direct marketing in the local area.

Salatin, who describes himself as a “Christian-libertarian-environmentalist-capitalist-lunatic-farmer,” says he considers farming a ministry to heal the land, and he spends nearly a third of the year lecturing.

Date: Saturday, February 2, 2013
Time: 7:30 pm
Location: Goddard Auditorium
Tickets/Registration Required? Yes

 

 

About the Author

Karole Passmore is a freelance writer who enjoys writing articles and short stories, interviewing local people, and researching non-fiction subject matter– preferably historical. Graduate of RHS, Ivy Tech Richmond, and Earlham College– with a major in History, Karole has spent most of her life in Wayne County and enjoys the quaint atmosphere of a small town.